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Woodland Strawberry

Fragaria vesca

Family:

Rosaceae

An attractive groundcover with the benefit of tasty berries.

Woodland garden

Woodland garden

Meadow or Grassland garden

Meadow / Grassland garden

Aggressive plant

Aggressive plant

Supports wide variety of wildlife

Supports wide variety of wildlife

Details

Emerges 

May

Seed collection

Flowers

May

white flowers

White

Lifecycle

Perennial

Lifespan

Height

-

25

cm

Width

-

25

cm

Habit

Forbs

Spreading

Spreading

Stoloniferous

Stoloniferous

Ecology

Supports

Supports songbirds

Songbirds

Supports bees

Bees

Supports beneficial insects

Beneficial insects

Providing

Provides seeds and berries

Seed/Berry source

Provides nesting material

Nesting material

Short-tongued bees visit the flowers, and leafcutter bees cut tidy circles from the leaves to line egg chambers. The berries are eaten by birds and small animals whereas larger animals graze on the leaves.

Habitat

Typically found in

disturbed areas, open woods, meadows

In the Garden

Growing Conditions

Moisture

Dry conditions

Dry

Average conditions

Average

Moist conditions

Moist

Light

Partial sun

Part sun

Partial shade

Part shade

Soil

Average garden soil

Propagation

Via

Seeds

Seeds

Division

Division

Sowing Recommendations

Sow seeds in Fall

Fall planting

Landscape

Use for:

Border placement

Border

Fall colour

Fall colour

Groundcover

Groundcover

Naturalization

Naturalization

Growing Tips

  • Can be an aggressive spreader if conditions are ideal, but is easily controlled by relocating new plants.

  • Propagation by division (relocating new plantlets) is easier than growing from seed.

Description

A perennial herb with tiny fragrant berries. New plants form at the end of the runners sent out by the parent plant. A useful and attractive groundcover for lightly shaded or open areas. Many cultivated varieties have been developed from Fragaria vesca. Differs from Virginia strawberry (Fragaria virginiana) in that dried seed-like fruits sit on the surface of the mature edible portion of the flower (commonly kown as the berry). Another difference to look for is backward-pointing sepals.

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