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Field Pussytoes (Pussytoes)

Antennaria neglecta

Family:

Aster family - Asteraceae

Field Pussytoes, with its unique male and female flower structures, offer an evergreen groundcover in tough spaces and serve as a larval host plant for American Painted Lady butterflies.

Woodland garden

Woodland garden

Container garden

Container garden

Meadow or Grassland garden

Meadow / Grassland garden

Rock garden

Rock garden

Pollinator garden

Pollinator garden

Adaptable

Adaptable

Details

Emerges 

Seed collection

Flowers

May, June

white flowers

White

June

Lifecycle

Perennial

Lifespan

Height

4

-

40

cm

Width

20

-

30

cm

Habit

Forbs

Mat-forming

Mat-forming

Stoloniferous

Stoloniferous

Spreading

Spreading

Herbaceous

Herbaceous

Ecology

Supports

Supports bees

Bees

Supports butterflies and moths

Butterflies & Moths

Supports beneficial insects

Beneficial insects

Providing

larval host plant

Larval host plant

Provides pollen source

Pollen source

Predominantly pollinated by small bees and flies, including halactid bees, cuckoo bees, syrphid flies, and tachinid flies, it is also a host plant to American painted lady butterflies.

Habitat

Typically found in

open woods, prairie, disturbed areas

Grows in mesic (average moisture) prairies and dry or sloped open woods.

In the Garden

Growing Conditions

Moisture

Dry conditions

Dry

Average conditions

Average

Moist conditions

Moist

Light

Full sun

Full sun

Partial sun

Part sun

Partial shade

Part shade

Soil

Average garden soil, Clay, Rocky, Loam

Propagation

Via

Seeds

Seeds

Division

Division

Sowing Recommendations

Sow seeds in Fall

Fall planting

Landscape

Use for:

Border placement

Border

Mass planting

Mass planting

Stabilization

Stabilization

Groundcover

Groundcover

Low maintenance gardening

Low maintenance gardening

Growing Tips

  • Field pussytoes are an adaptible plant, tolerating poor soil and moister conditions than other native pussytoes, and some sources suggest it can grow well in dry, shady locations. It won't tolerate soggy conditions, however—well-drained soil is a must. 

  • This species has separate male and female flowers grown on different plants (only identifiable in bloom), so planting several is recommended. 

Description

Field pussytoes form patches of low, evergreen groundcover spreading via stolons. The small basal leaves, dark green on the upper surface and hairy white beneath create a silvery effect. This is an excellent plant for borders and rock gardens. Like other pussytoes, its spreading, mat-forming habit helps reduce weed growth and stabilize soil.

Male flowers are broader and more showy than the narrower, cylindrical female flowers which produce heads of white seeds until late summer.

Common in grasslands and open woods, this species prefers somewhat moister situations than its uniformly grey-leaved relative, little-leaf pussytoes. However, they may be grown together in the garden.

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